Nigella’s maple pecan bundt cake

After months of very little baking, October seems to be the month of baking in our house. So far I have baked chocolate chip cookies and brownies (for my boyfriend to take to work to celebrate his birthday) and a maple pecan bundt cake for his 30th birthday. All 3 recipes are from Nigella’s new book Kitchen and all 3 turned out beautifully. I’ve still got to bake something for our late Macmillan coffee morning at work on friday and something to take in to work for my birthday next week. Just as well then that Tate and Lyle sent me a range of their fair trade sugars to tell you about. They are committed to making their range 100% fair trade and have a new design to their packaging too. Why not have a look at their fantastic baking facebook page here.

I loved the maple pecan bundt cake. The cake itself was delicious and moist but the best thing about this cake is the surprise that comes when you cut in to it. The maple syrup and pecan filling is to die for! The cookies worked really well too. I’ve made quiet a few cookie recipes before but these were by far the best texture wise, crunchy outside and chewy in the middle. The only negative was, for me, they were perhaps a little too sweet. The everyday brownie recipe was easy to make and the results were gooey and delicious.

I bought Nigella’s book on a bit whim whilst I was taking a break from revision last month. It was a bargain at just £13 and almost 500 pages. It is however my first Nigella cookbook! I know, I know I’m a bit late finding Nigella but I never watched her shows until this summer when that seemed to be all that was showing on the Good food channel. I’ve always thought of her cooking as being too “unhealthy” but with the bargain price, delicious looking pictures and me desperate to get back in to the kitchen trying out new recipes, I decided to give it a go.

The book doesn’t disappoint, I instantly loved her style of writing and only 20 pages in I found I’d read nearly every word and learnt quiet a few hints and tips. As for the recipes, first impressions are that they don’t seem as unhealthy as I thought. Yes there are a lot of baking recipes but I don’t bake that often, for just the two of us, but when I do  have an occasion to bake for, it’s nice to have a selection of recipes you can trust to turn out well. There are some savory recipes I’ll never cook or that I would experiment with replacing or reducing the butter etc but not as many as I expected and anyway it’s all about moderation and using your own judgment. Now a days I tend to look at the balance of the types of food we eat over a week rather than in one day, we all need the occasional treat. All in all a great book that I can see myself going back to regularly. I may even have to take a look at some of her earlier books.

Maple pecan bundt cake

for the maple pecan filling:

75g plain flour
30g soft unsalted butter
1 tsp ground cinnamon
150g pecans (or walnuts), roughly chopped
125ml maple syrup

for the cake:

300g plain flour
1tsp baking powder
1tsp bicarbonate of soda
125g soft unsalted butter
150g caster sugar
2 eggs
250ml creme fraiche or sour cream
1-2 tsp icing sugar, for decoration
flavourless oil, for greasing

1x23cm bundt tin

  • Preheat the oven to 180C/gas 4. Using flavourless oil grease your bundt tin, and leave upside down on newspaper for the excess oil to drain out.
  • Make the filling for the cake by mixing together the 75g flour and 30g butter with a fork, till you end up with the sort of mixture you’d expect when making crumble topping. Then, still using the fork, mix in the cinnamon, chopped nuts and maple syrup, to form a sticky, bumpy paste. set a side for a moment.
  • For the cake, measure 300g flour, the baking powder and bicarb into a bowl.
  • Now, cream the butter and sugar together, then beat in 1tbsp of the flour mixture, then 1 egg, then another tbsp of flour mixture followed by the second egg.
  • Add the rest of the flour mixture beating as you go, and then finally the creme fraiche or sour cream. You should expect to end up with a fairly firm cake batter.
  • Spoon just more than half the cake batter into the oiled bundt tin. Spread the mixture up the sides a little and around the funnel of the tin to create a rim. You don’t want the sticky filling to leak out the sides of the tin.
  • Dollop the maple filling carefully in to the dent in the cake batter, then cover the filling with the remaining batter. Smooth the top and put the tin in the oven for 40 minutes, though it’s best to check with a cake tester after 30 minutes.
  • Once cooked, and the cake tester comes out clean where it hits the sponge (obviously, any gooey filling will stick to the tester), let the cake cool on a wire rack for 15 minutes in its tin, then loosen the edges with a small spatula, including around the middle funnel bit, and turn the cake out onto the rack.
  • When the cake is cold, dust with icing sugar by pushing a teaspoon or so through a tea strainer.
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7 thoughts on “Nigella’s maple pecan bundt cake

  1. Hiya,

    I made the Bundt cake yesterday, i love the crumb of the cake batter and i love the texture of the filling… i was slightly disappointed at the lack of maple flavour though! I used good syrup and there is plenty of it in the recipe, however you simply can’t taste any maple in the cake… such a shame.
    Any idea if i went wrong? Maybe i should bolster it with some maple extract??

    Best
    Rachel

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